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About us

Bronislaw is an online magazine of new anthropological thought and debate. Our main purpose is in one hand to help disseminating anthropological research to a broader public, but in so doing, also to create a space where anthropologists can go beyond the limited frames of academic publishing and allow themselves to develop thoughts and questions that have arisen during research, to broaden fieldwork-based reflections, to expose developing ideas to community debate, or even to join into other contemporary anthropological debates by replying to essays published here or elsewhere.

In contrast to other equally important initiatives in this field such as blogs, academic journals or fieldwork notes publications, we want to stand out and explore different possibilities of anthropological publishing and debate.

We expect to do so, first and foremost, by blending together the openness of blogging language and debate with the specific advantages of a quarterly magazine dynamics. One where the reader is always sure to find a well-curated collection of texts in the most diverse areas of social and cultural research every three months, and where the contributor knows s/he will find a safe place to expose ideas, as diverse or provocative they may be, from all possible backgrounds and trajectories. Contributors may come from diverse anthropological or institutional cultures themselves, with different ways of perceiving the discipline. They may also come from other disciplines, and even from outside of academia.

In that sense, Bronislaw presents itself as an anthropological magazine in the broader sense of the word anthropological, that is, not as a discipline, but rather as a reflective way of being in contact with specific collectives of people and under specific circumstances in space and time, which some of us will recognize under the term ethnography.

Also, we probably differ from other dissemination magazines in the sense that we do not see dissemination only as a means to bridge the gap between institutional anthropologists and the ordinary reader through simplified language. Rather, what we propose is to use simplified, non-academic language to rethink anthropological debate, to make it dynamic as the language it uses, and to bridge the gap not only with the regular reader, but also between authors coming from such different backgrounds.

Finally, we insist in the word dynamic to describe our way of seeing debate as something open, public, and accessible. In practical terms, every issue of Bronislaw will open a space for contributors to reply to previous articles published here in our magazine, and even outside of it, in a mix of magazine and discussion board way of working.

To put it brieflyBronislaw lies somewhere between a dissemination magazine, an anthropology blog, a discussion forum, the in-the-corridor post-class school conversation, and a giant gathering of people with different backgrounds exchanging their views on different aspects of life in this world as social human beings.  

About the editors

Rafael Lasevitz is a Brazilian anthropologist who has graduated in Social Sciences at the Universidade de Brasília with a study on the various elitization and segregation devices in use on the renovated Brasilía's public lakeshore. He went on to pursue his M.A. degree in Social Anthropology at the same university with a fieldwork focused on the production of space and time during the 2000s wave of Bolivian textile-workers immigration in São Paulo in a borderline situation in constant tension with formal institutions. He is presently a PhD candidate in Anthropology at the Université de Montréal where he studies the impacts of great socioeconomical development projects on the life trajectories of the inhabitants of two mining towns in Quebec's mining belt of Abitibi-Témiscamingue, in Canada. He is also a chief editor for Raimundo, an online magazine of new Portuguese language literature.

Luminita-Anda Mandache is a Romanian anthropologist who graduated in Communication and Public Relations at the National School for Administrative Studies in Bucharest with an ethnographic and visual research on the graffiti movement in Bucharest. Interest in ethnography, urban anthropology and informality as a way of expressing urban narratives motivated her to pursue a M.A. degree in Social  Anthropology at the Université Louvain-la-Neuve. Her M.A. research focused on the organization and the functioning of the informal economy in Santiago de Chile's greatest marketplace.  Currently Luminita is pursuing a PhD in Social and Applied Anthropology specializing in economic and development anthropology. Her dissertation research explores the nature of poverty and the strategies for daily survival  of inhabitants in a context of extreme poverty and urban violence at the margins of the Brazilian northeastern city of Fortaleza, in the state of Ceará.

Anca Serbanuta is a Romanian anthropologist.

 

 

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BronislawMagazine of provocative open-ended anthropological debate

Who are we? Bronislaw is an online magazine of new anthropological thought and debate. Our main purpose is in one hand to help disseminating anthropological research to a broader public, but in so doing, also to create a space where anthropologists can go beyond the limited frames of academic publishing and allow themselves to develop thoughts and questions that have arisen during research, to broaden fieldwork-based reflections, to expose developing ideas to community debate, or even to join into other contemporary anthropological debates by replying to essays published here or elsewhere.

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