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Publishing norms

Norms for the publishing of essays on our next edition.

Bronislaw's permanent call for essays

Bronislaw is an online magazine of new anthropological thought and debate focused on fieldwork research. Our main purpose is in one hand to help disseminating anthropological research to a broader public, but in so doing, also to create a space where anthropologists can go beyond the limited frames of academic publishing and allow themselves to develop thoughts and questions that have arisen during research, to broaden fieldwork-based reflections, to expose developing ideas to community debate, or even to join into other contemporary anthropological debates by replying to essays published here or elsewhere.

To put it briefly, Bronislaw lies somewhere between a dissemination magazine, an anthropology blog, a discussion forum, the in-the-corridor post-class school conversation, and a giant gathering of people with different backgrounds exchanging their views on different aspects of life in this world as social human beings. 

You may want to read more about us in our About section before moving on to our publishing norms.

If you want to contribute to Bronislaw, you will find below a list of general norms as well as content-specific norms according to your proposition. We emphasize that although the magazine is focused on anthropology, essays coming from other disciplines are more than welcome as long as they are based on ethnographical fieldworks or propose an ethnography related discussion.

General norms

Ideally we would like to publish essays that stem from published ethnography-based academical research or from ongoing fieldwork. However, other possibilities and general reflexions are more than welcome and will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Texts should be written in English and count no more than 6000 words, but we are open for demands for special accomodations. We encourage short, blog-like essays. There is no minimal size

Authors may send us as many essays as they would like. However, a maximum of three essays will be published by author per edition. Also, non-published essays will have to be re-sent in order to be considered for subsequent editions.

> Submissions must contain: full name, nationality (optional), filiation (present or previous, if any), degree/position, link to original publication (if based on one), essay's subdomain(s) (ex.: urban anthropology, gender, politics), a one-line abstract, and keywords. Further data will be asked for only in case of publication.  

> Formatting: we ask that submitted texts be sent when possible in Word or Open Office file formats, Calibri, Times or Arial fonts sized 12, justified, 1,5 line space.

> Language: although often research-inspired, these are non-academical texts, and therefore language should take into account the non-expert reader. We expect a blog-like, informal language. On the same grounds, bibliographical references should be avoided unless absolutely necessary and then, incorporated naturally to the text. Our editors understand that authors will often have little or no experience with popular dissemination of their research and reflections and will therefore be available to answer questions on the subject, as well as in mentoring writing processes

> Samples: some times only reading some of the text we have published in the past will make clear the kind of writing that we expect. Authors may use, amongst others, these texts as good editorial references of what we are looking for:

> http://www.bronislawmag.com/1/pd_pol.php
> http://www.bronislawmag.com/1/rl_pubpol.php
> http://www.bronislawmag.com/1/as_urb.php

Essays

In our view, there are different possible essays. The classic essay will simply "translate" an original research into a more accessible language. However, an essay may also try to take one reflection caused by research or fieldwork and develop thoughts and reflections on it. Remember, there is no minimal size. Already published blog posts are welcome to be sent to us if they fit our requisites and as long as their republishing doesn't hurt legal rules or ethical expectations. Essays are encouraged to be thought-provocative and even speculative, as long as speculation is done with responsibilty and self-awareness.

Categories for essays include, but are not limited to: politics, gender, environment, health, economics, arts, urban life, language and media, immigration. Essays will be classified by the editorial board, but suggestions are welcome, including for categories not mentioned in this space.

Replies (debates)

Bronislaw encourages open-ended, interdisciplinary, public and published debating of ideas. Submissions must explicitly refer to essays published at Bronislaw, or to ethnography or culture related influential texts published elsewhere. Replies to replies are also encouraged, always as long as a respectful language and approach is consistently used within the text.

Bear in mind a reply can be a contestation, a commentary, or an extrapolation of the original argument.

References can and should be used to support criticism if the author feels it to be necessary. Authors from different domains as well as independent authors are more than welcome to submit replies.

Photo essays

Photo essays can be regular essays that simply include photography as a support tool, but they can also be essays that use photography as a main vehicle of communication, leaving text as a support. In both cases, the Essay section applies for text matters. Photos should be in JPEG, PNG or other common formats, each having no more than 5MB. Individuals photographed must have granted authorization for the photographies to be published and shouldn't hurt legal rules or ethical expectations. Photos may be used as cover image for an edition and redimensioned as necessary for such purposes.

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For further questions, language mentoring or for text submission, write us at bronislaw@bronislawmag.com.

 

 

Send us your essays, photo essays and replies to:

 

bronislaw@bronislawmag.com

 

 

   

Bronislaw Magazine of provocative open-ended anthropological debate

Who are we? Bronislaw is an online magazine of new anthropological thought and debate. Our main purpose is in one hand to help disseminating anthropological research to a broader public, but in so doing, also to create a space where anthropologists can go beyond the limited frames of academic publishing and allow themselves to develop thoughts and questions that have arisen during research, to broaden fieldwork-based reflections, to expose developing ideas to community debate, or even to join into other contemporary anthropological debates by replying to essays published here or elsewhere.

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